Day of Infamy

Please take a moment of time today to remember Pearl Harbor Day and remember those that gave the ultimate sacrifice for our nation and our Navy.  Below is an excellent article about remembering that day and lesson from the Day of Infamy.  One major lesson from that day as the article states is "that together we can accomplish more than any one".  This is so true, as a nation we came together for a national purpose and we must never forget the sacrifices of those before us and learn from those lessons to continue to make this country the best it could be. 

Lessons From Day Of Infamy  (NORFOLK VIRGINIAN-PILOT 07 DEC 11)

It is the surprise attack by which all surprise attacks are measured, just as it shaped the war by which all modern war is weighed.

Seventy years ago today, just before 8 a.m., Japanese forces attacked Pearl Harbor in Hawaii. Two hours later, 21 U.S. ships were sunk or damaged; nearly 200 U.S. airplanes were destroyed, many before they could take off. More than 2,400 Americans were dead or dying.  The next day, the United States declared war on its attacker. Within a week, America was also at war with Germany and Italy.  Thankfully, such facts are basic knowledge. Seventy years later, the scope of that war, the way it changed every detail of every American life, is an intricate part of our national experience.

It has been safeguarded by those who lived through Pearl Harbor, who liberated Buchenwald, who fought for Iwo Jima, who bombed Yokohama, who built ships in Portsmouth, who planted victory gardens in Suffolk. By those people who, in whatever way, sacrificed in the name of an America under attack.

It is worth remembering, too, what led to that sacrifice. In the days after Pearl Harbor, there was an immediate national purpose that wouldn't come again for 60 years. But in 1941 there were no lobbyists angling for a payoff, no politicians elevating party above nation.  There was no time for them, no patience. We were a country facing an enemy who wanted nothing less than to destroy us.  In 1941, that changed America. It roused us from the lingering effects of the Great Depression. Despite the fresh horrors that were to come, the transformation that began on Dec. 7 is worth remembering and protecting. Especially now.

Those who guard that memory are themselves fading. Most are already gone, the victims of time.  They still have much to teach us. They remind us that we once believed in sacrifice as a national duty. That there is virtue in thrift. That we are responsible for our neighbors and their neighbors. That politicians once wanted to be statesmen, leaders.  That together we can accomplish more than any one.  We can't stop the calendar. So, we while we can, we should listen.  We should learn the lessons that can be drawn from every bloody history and especially from this one. That is how such stories will live. That is how a nation knows itself - and how it finds its best self.

Listed below are some articles, audio recordings, photos and web sites with recollections and accounts of that day. 

70 years on, Pearl Harbor survivors share tales http://www.navytimes.com/news/2011/12/ap-pearl-harbor-70-years-survivors-share-tales-120611/

Pearl Harbor Overview by Naval Historical and Heritage Command http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/events/wwii-pac/pearlhbr/pearlhbr.htm

Photos on Naval Historical and Heritage Command web site http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/events/wwii-pac/pearlhbr/ph-oa.htm

Interviews with Pearl Harbor eyewitnesses http://teacher.scholastic.com/pearl/transcript.htm

Audio recording of announcement of attack http://www.earthstation1.com/WWIIAudio/CBS_120741.wav

Audio recording of President Roosevelt's speech before Congress http://www.radiochemistry.org/history/video/fdr_infamy.html
Please take a moment of time today to remember Pearl Harbor Day and remember those that gave the ultimate sacrifice for our nation and our Navy.  Below is an excellent article about remembering that day and lesson from the Day of Infamy.  One major lesson from that day as the article states is "that together we can accomplish more than any one".  This is so true, as a nation we came together for a national purpose and we must never forget the sacrifices of those before us and learn from those lessons to continue to make this country the best it could be.  

Lessons From Day Of Infamy  (NORFOLK VIRGINIAN-PILOT 07 DEC 11) 

It is the surprise attack by which all surprise attacks are measured, just as it shaped the war by which all modern war is weighed.

Seventy years ago today, just before 8 a.m., Japanese forces attacked Pearl Harbor in Hawaii. Two hours later, 21 U.S. ships were sunk or damaged; nearly 200 U.S. airplanes were destroyed, many before they could take off. More than 2,400 Americans were dead or dying.  The next day, the United States declared war on its attacker. Within a week, America was also at war with Germany and Italy.  Thankfully, such facts are basic knowledge. Seventy years later, the scope of that war, the way it changed every detail of every American life, is an intricate part of our national experience.

It has been safeguarded by those who lived through Pearl Harbor, who liberated Buchenwald, who fought for Iwo Jima, who bombed Yokohama, who built ships in Portsmouth, who planted victory gardens in Suffolk. By those people who, in whatever way, sacrificed in the name of an America under attack.

It is worth remembering, too, what led to that sacrifice. In the days after Pearl Harbor, there was an immediate national purpose that wouldn't come again for 60 years. But in 1941 there were no lobbyists angling for a payoff, no politicians elevating party above nation.  There was no time for them, no patience. We were a country facing an enemy who wanted nothing less than to destroy us.  In 1941, that changed America. It roused us from the lingering effects of the Great Depression. Despite the fresh horrors that were to come, the transformation that began on Dec. 7 is worth remembering and protecting. Especially now.

Those who guard that memory are themselves fading. Most are already gone, the victims of time.  They still have much to teach us. They remind us that we once believed in sacrifice as a national duty. That there is virtue in thrift. That we are responsible for our neighbors and their neighbors. That politicians once wanted to be statesmen, leaders.  That together we can accomplish more than any one.  We can't stop the calendar. So, we while we can, we should listen.  We should learn the lessons that can be drawn from every bloody history and especially from this one. That is how such stories will live. That is how a nation knows itself - and how it finds its best self.

Listed below are some articles, audio recordings, photos and web sites with recollections and accounts of that day.  

70 years on, Pearl Harbor survivors share tales http://www.navytimes.com/news/2011/12/ap-pearl-harbor-70-years-survivors-share-tales-120611/

Pearl Harbor Overview by Naval Historical and Heritage Command http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/events/wwii-pac/pearlhbr/pearlhbr.htm

Photos on Naval Historical and Heritage Command web site http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/events/wwii-pac/pearlhbr/ph-oa.htm

Interviews with Pearl Harbor eyewitnesses http://teacher.scholastic.com/pearl/transcript.htm

Audio recording of announcement of attack http://www.earthstation1.com/WWIIAudio/CBS_120741.wav

Audio recording of President Roosevelt's speech before Congress http://www.radiochemistry.org/history/video/fdr_infamy.html

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